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Sourav Ganguly: Cricket, Captaincy and Controversy

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What makes Virat Kohli the undisputed monarch of the cricket world today is not his iconic status in the sports hierarchy but that the highest praise comes from the opposition camp and past greats.
However, his family didn't always have it good. No stranger to loss, Kohli's biggest support both on and off the field – his father, succumbed to a cerebral stroke when he was very young. In a fitting tribute that would've made his old man proud, Kohli returned to continue an innings just a few hours after his father passed away. 'He was the one who drove me to practice every day,' the captain of the Indian Test team recalls with characteristic humility and grace. Widely travelled sports journalist Vijay Lokapally goes on to recount happier times on the journey of Virat's rapid rise to international stardom, an account punctuated with little-known stories by his fellow players, coaches and intimates. At 27, he has already been the recipient of countless accolades including the Arjuna Award, the title of BCCI's 'international cricketer of the Year' as well as the ICC's 'ODI Player of the Year', but for Kohli it's not about the money or the fame, or the roar of the crowds or the flattering attention from women of all ages. Few know of his altruistic nature and his dedication to numerous charities for under-privileged children. What has not escaped the public eye though, is how this wizard of the willow wears his heavy mantle with such insouciant ease. - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/in/driven-9789385936265/#sthash.Bc4WDCcg.dpuf

Sourav Ganguly is a difficult icon. He is undoubtedly one of India's most successful captains, one who molded a new team when India was at its lowest ebb, reeling from the betting scandal. There can be no argument about his cricketing genius, right from the time he scored a Test century at Lord's to the time he led India to the 2003 World Cup final. But the world of cricketing fans is divided into those who adore him fiercely and despise him greatly.

He could be arrogant on occasion: Ganguly allegedly refused to carry the drinks as a twelfth man. He constantly challenged authority. Greg Chappell discarded him from the team during his stint as coach. Ganguly cared little for convention: remember the bare-chested celebration at an Indian win?

Yet, in all the years of his roller-coaster ride through Indian cricket, no one questioned the man's utter devotion to the game or his team. In this account of one of India's greatest cricketers, shot through with intimate details, Saptarshi Sarkar tackles controversies around the legendary cricketer head on.

Racy and gripping, Sourav Ganguly: Cricket, Captaincy and Controversy investigates the big events in Dada's interesting career. It probes the symbiotic relationship between the man and the cricketer. What was Ganguly thinking before a match? Why did he demand that the grass be trimmed just before start of play at the Nagpur pitch? What was the Indian dressing room like? What was that Greg Chappell chapter all about?

An unflinching biography of a man who never shied away from controversies, this is as much a ready reckoner for Sourav Ganguly fans as it is an examination of a crucial era in Indian cricket.

What makes Virat Kohli the undisputed monarch of the cricket world today is not his iconic status in the sports hierarchy but that the highest praise comes from the opposition camp and past greats.
However, his family didn't always have it good. No stranger to loss, Kohli's biggest support both on and off the field – his father, succumbed to a cerebral stroke when he was very young. In a fitting tribute that would've made his old man proud, Kohli returned to continue an innings just a few hours after his father passed away. 'He was the one who drove me to practice every day,' the captain of the Indian Test team recalls with characteristic humility and grace. Widely travelled sports journalist Vijay Lokapally goes on to recount happier times on the journey of Virat's rapid rise to international stardom, an account punctuated with little-known stories by his fellow players, coaches and intimates. At 27, he has already been the recipient of countless accolades including the Arjuna Award, the title of BCCI's 'international cricketer of the Year' as well as the ICC's 'ODI Player of the Year', but for Kohli it's not about the money or the fame, or the roar of the crowds or the flattering attention from women of all ages. Few know of his altruistic nature and his dedication to numerous charities for under-privileged children. What has not escaped the public eye though, is how this wizard of the willow wears his heavy mantle with such insouciant ease. - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/in/driven-9789385936265/#sthash.Bc4WDCcg.dpuf

Published: 2015
Pages: 302
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Harper Sport

Bloomsbury